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EPS Prize Lecture: 1994-2014

The EPS Prize was established by the Committee in 1993 with the aim of recognising distinguished research achievement by experimental psychologists at an early stage in their career. Nominees should have obtained their PhD no more than 10 years previously, although this requirement may be waived by the Committee in special circumstances, e.g. where a nominee has taken a career break.

Nominations may be made by any Ordinary Member of the Society. Each nomination must include the nominee’s CV, with a covering letter which describes how the nominee has made independent scientific contributions to Experimental Psychology that are innovative or original, and have had a substantial impact on research or theory. The letter should mention any evidence that the nominee is held in high esteem, has been influential, or is regarded as an authority, among scientists nationally and internationally. Nominations should be sent to the Hon Secretary by the closing date of 1 September each year.

Nominees need not be restricted to EPS members or those of British nationality. The Committee will make a recommendation to the Annual General Meeting, at which members elect the prizewinner. The prizewinner will be invited to deliver the EPS Prize Lecture to any of the Society's meetings in the forthcoming year. As in the case of the Bartlett Lecture, the EPS Prize Lecture will be open to all, and a manuscript based on the Lecture should be submitted to the Society for publication.

An honorarium (whose value is determined by the Committee) is paid on delivery of the manuscript of the Lecture in a form suitable for publication. For further details, see the Society's rules 43-48.

EPS Prize Lectures 1994-2013

  1. Is human learning rational?
    David Shanks, University College London.
    Department of Psychology, Washington Singer Laboratories, University of Exeter, 8 July, 1994.
  2. Cross modal interactions in attention.
    Jon Driver, University of Cambridge.
    Department of Psychology, University of Birmingham, 12 July, 1995.
  3. Co-ordinating actions.
    Patrick Haggard, University College London.
    Department of Psychology, University College London, 3 January, 1996.
  4. The rational analysis of cognition.
    Nick Chater, University of Warwick
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, 20 March, 1997.
  5. The time course of perceptual categorization.
    Koen Lamberts, University of Birmingham
    Psychology Lecture Theatre, University of York, 3 July, 1998.
  6. Associative priming in Pavlovian conditioning.
    Rob Honey, Cardiff University
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, 17 March, 1999.
  7. Deficit and difference in autistic cognition.
    Francesca Happé, University of London
    National Hospital, Queen Square, London, 7 January, 2000.
  8. Large-scale space and episodic memory.
    Neil Burgess, University College London
    Department of Psychology, University College London, 4 January, 2001.
  9. The role of the prefrontal cortex in actions and habits.
    Simon Killcross, Cardiff University
    Department of Psychology, University of Leuven, Belgium, 10 April, 2002.
  10. Crossmodal attention and multisensory integration.
    Charles Spence, Oxford University
    Department of Psychology, University College London, 7 January, 2003.
  11. What can functional imaging tell the experimental psychologist?
    Richard Henson, University College London
    Department of Psychology, University College London, 5 January, 2004.
  12. A framework for facial expression recognition: Better late than never.
    Andy Calder, MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit
    Department of Psychology, University College London, 6 January, 2005.
  13. Making connections between learning to read and reading to learn.
    Kate Nation, University of Oxford
    Department of Psychology, University College London, 4 January, 2007.
  14. Decoding consciousness.
    Geraint Rees, University College London
    Appleton Tower, University of Edinburgh, 4 July 2007.
  15. Decision by sampling.
    Neil Stewart, University of Warwick
    Department of Psychology, University College London, 3 January 2008
  16. Fractionating the musical mind: Insights from congenital amusia.
    Lauren Stewart, Goldsmith's University of London
    Tempest Anderson Hall, Yorkshire Museum, 9 July 2009
  17. What is "Theory of mind"?
    Ian Apperly, University of Birmingham
    Samuel Alexander Building, University of Manchester, 8 July 2010
  18. Licking and liking: The assessment of hedonic responses in rodents.
    Dominic Dwyer, Cardiff University
    School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, 7 July 2011
  19. Memory and the brain: Convergence and divergence between neuroimaging and neuropsychology.
    Jon Simons, University of Cambridge
    Department of Psychology, University College London, 6 January 2012
  20. Towards a neurocognitive framework for social interaction.
    Antonia Hamilton, University of Nottingham
    Main Arts Building, Bangor University, 4 July 2013
  21. Distorted bidy representations in healthy adults.
    Matt Longo, Birkbeck College, University of London
    Ridley Building 2, Newcastle University, 17 July 2014