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News

Forthcoming EPS Research Workshops

EPS Regret Workshop, to be held at University of Birmingham, 12 February 2016 - organisers Professor Teresa McCormack and Dr Sarah Beck (more details below)

EPS Science of Magic, to be held at Goldsmiths, University of London, 19 February 2016 - organiser Dr Gustav Kuhn

Oculomotor Readiness and Covert Attention (ORCA), to be held at Durham University, 5 April 2016 - organiser Dr Daniel Smith

Novel approaches to Independent Component Analysis (ICA) of resting-state and task-based fMRI data, to be held at University of Oxford, prior to the EPS meeting - organisers Dr Rebecca Jackson and Professor Matthew Lambon Ralph (more details below)

Using eye movements recordings to study literacy development in cheildren, to be held at University of Southampton, August 2016 - organiser Dr Hazel Blythe

For information about conferences organised by EPS, see Meetings.


QJEP Announcements

The Psychology of Associative Learning

Guest Editors

Ian McLaren - University of Exeter

Mark Haselgrove - University of Nottingham


Associative learning in humans and other animals is a topic of general interest to the readership of the Quarterly Journal. The aim of this special issue will be to bring that interest to a sharp focus by concentrating on those areas of associative learning that were of particular interest to Prof N J Mackintosh, who was editor of the Quarterly Journal from 1977 to 1985 (a span equalled only by Oliver Zangwill), the 22nd Bartlett Lecturer and who passed away in February this year. His work was notable for being ahead of its time in many ways, and for setting the agenda for a great deal of the current research into associative learning. His research into perceptual learning and representation development, the effect of associative history on attention and learning, the mechanisms underlying inhibition, and the processes underlying more complex forms of discrimination learning and problem solving continues to inspire psychologists around the world, and his emphasis on translating the basic associative theory developed in working with animals into experiments on and models of human behaviour remains relevant now.

The special issue solicits contributions from leading researchers in the field of associative learning. It will cover the areas set out above, and aims to be a mix of empirical and theoretical papers. It is anticipated that topics will include, but are not limited to: Automatic imitation of grasping, learned taste-aversions, learned attentional capture, discrimination learning and peak shift, conditioned inhibition, spatial navigation, instrumental conditioning, and acquired changes in cue or outcome processing.

Schedule:

Authors are requested to provide titles and abstracts by Easter 2016. Full manuscript submission is scheduled for October 2016. We anticipate publication in Easter 2017.

  

Comments and Book Reviews

Listed below are the books that are currently available for review in the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. Expressions of interest regarding reviewing should be directed to Philip Quinlan (email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it )


Barker Bausell, R. (2015). The design and conduct of meaningful experiments involving human participants. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press

Britt, T. W., & Jes, S. M. (2015). Thriving under stress. Harnessing demands in the workplace. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press

Busemeyer, J. R., Wang Z., Townsend, J. T. & Eidels, A (Eds). (2015). The Oxford handbook of computational and mathematical psychology. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press

Chater, N., Clark, A., Goldsmith, J. A., & Perfors, A. (2015). Empiricism and language learnability. Oxford UK: Oxford University Press

Chiocchio, F., Kelloway, E. K., & Hobbs, B. (Eds). (2015). The psychology and management of project teams. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press

Cohen Kadosh, R., & Dowker, A. (Eds). (2015). The Oxford handbook of numerical cognition. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press

Damon, W., & Colby, A. (2015). The power of ideals. The real story of moral choice. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press

Elasmith, C. (2013). How to build a brain. A neural architecture for biological cognition. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press

Haukioja, J. (Ed). (2015). Advances in experimental philosophy of language. London, UK: Bloomsbury Academic

Hess-Biber, S. N., & Johnson, R. B. (Eds). (2015). The Oxford handbook of multimethod and mixed methods research inquiry. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press

Jensen, L. A. (Ed). (2015). The Oxford handbook of human development and culture. An interdisciplinary perspective. Oxford UK: Oxford University Press

Markovits, H. (2014). The development psychology of reasoning and decision-making. London, UK: Psychology Press

Marzillier, J. (2014). The trauma therapies. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press

Nadel, J. (2014). How imitation boosts development. In infancy and autsm spectrum disorder. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press

Overgaard, M. (Ed). (2015). Behavioral methods in consciousness research. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press

Power, M. (2015). Madness cracked. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press

Redish, A. D. (2013). The mind within the brain. How we make decisions and those decisions go wrong. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press

Sarkissian, H., & Cole Wright, J. (Eds). (2014). Advances in experimental moral psychology. Bloomsbury, London: Bloomsbury Academic

Shook, J. R., & Solymosi, T. (Eds). (2014). Pragmatist neurophilosophy. American philosophy and the brain. Bloomsbury, London: Bloomsbury Academic

Sytsma, J. (Ed). (2014). Advances in experimental philosophy of mind. Bloomsbury, London: Bloomsbury Academic

Wagemans, J. (Ed). (2015). The Oxford handbook of perceptual organization. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press

Willis, G. B. (2015). Analysis of the cognitive interview in questionnaire design. Oxford UK: Oxford University Press


Update to policy 

QJEP has made two changes to the existing policies. First, comments will be allowed to alleviate the problem that readers have few options to raise their concerns (or support) about an article published in QJEP. Comments are short (1000 words at most), deal with articles published in QJEP or with general issues faced by psychological researchers, and will be published at the end of an issue. Normally they will not go to reviewers but be decided upon at the Editorial level. Given our experiences at the Meetings of the Experimental Psychology Society, it is our conviction that such commentaries can become a vital and very informative part of the journal.


We also discovered that many readers miss the Book Reviews section, which had to be dropped a few years ago because the publication lag was becoming too long. Now that the journal has many more pages (and could further extend if needed), there is an opportunity to revitalise that part. Philip Quinlan kindly accepted to be the new Book Review Editor of the journal and readers are invited to send him suggestion of must-be-reviewed books. More importantly, readers who want to help making this section a success, are invited to send in their names as possible reviewers (please also include your subjects of expertise/interest).


Members' Announcements

The EPS makes no representations or warranties in relation to Members' announcements.


The Study of Regret - EPS Workshop

(Details at top of page) http://www.epsscienceofregret.com/

The study of regret can be hailed as a success story in psychological science: there are good experimental paradigms which have led to detailed findings that have been used to test mathematical models; there is now an established neuroscience of regret; we are beginning to understand its importance in development and old age; and we have been able to turn some of our knowledge into interventions designed to improve decisions making. With this workshop we hope to provide a showcase for the very wide variety of ways in which regret is currently being investigated. We hope to promote conversations between proponents of these different approaches with the ultimate aim of promoting collaborations.

Novel Approaches to ICA of Resting State and Task Data - EPS Workshop

(Details at top of page)

This workshop will focus on novel approaches designed to increase the usefulness of ICA, such as clinical application, maintaining a link to function, assessment of stimulation-related changes in connectivity and assessing how networks interact. The workshop will take place prior to the EPS meeting. For more information and to register for a place, please email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

CogModel notes

Readers interested in cognitive modelling might be interested in the following notes with news about ICCM16 / upcoming conferences, announcements and jobs: http://acs.ist.psu.edu/iccm2016/iccm-mailing-oct2015.html

Online Resource for Speakers

A new outreach/public engagement initiative that can be accessed by, and for, psychologists. www.speakezee.org The resource allows researchers to identify their areas of expertise and background.

Open consultation from BIS

Science and research: proposals for long-term capital investment (BIS website) 

About the consultation: The Government’s ambition is to make the UK the best place in the world to do science and research. This is why the government is making a long-term commitment to invest in science and research infrastructure. They are increasing capital investment in real terms to £1.1 billion in 2015 to 2016, growing in line with inflation each year to 2020 to 2021. This consultation seeks views on how the UK makes the most of this opportunity. The government will publish a ‘Science capital roadmap’. It will set out the long-term plan for a world-leading science and research infrastructure in the autumn and they are seeking evidence to help inform the development of this plan.

You can respond online or by email to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

New text from Royal Society Publishing - Language as a multimodal phenomenon: implications for language learning, processing and evolution

Royal Society Publishing has just published Language as a multimodal phenomenon: implications for language learning, processing and evolution, compiled and edited by Gabriella Vigliocco, Pamela Perniss, Robin L. Thompson and David Vinson. This content can be accessed at http://bit.ly/PTB1651 A print version is also available at the special price of £35.00. You can order online via the above web page (enter special code TB 1651 when prompted) or, alternatively, you can contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

New text from Royal Society Publishing - Language in developmental and acquired disorders

Royal Society Publishing has just published Language in developmental and acquired disorders, organized and edited by Dorothy VM Bishop, Kate Nation and Karalyn Patterson. The contents can be accessed at: http://bit.ly/1eVtxla A print version is also available at the special price of £35.00. You can order online via the above web page (enter special code TB 1634 when prompted) or, alternatively, you can contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it