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The Frith Prize: 2011-2013

The Frith Prize is a new EPS Early Career Award established in 2011 by a gift from Chris and Uta Frith. Its purpose is to recognise experimental psychologists at the start of their career who have produced an exceptional body of work in their PhD thesis. The thesis should have been examined not more than two years before the nomination.

The nomination should include a supporting letter from the primary supervisor (who must be an EPS member), the abstract of the thesis, the nominee’s CV including description of any conference presentations and publications arising directly from the thesis work, one draft or published manuscript based on the thesis work, and a supporting statement from the External Examiner (who does not need to be an EPS member). The nominees need not be EPS members or of British nationality. Nominations should be sent to the Hon Secretary by the closing date of 1 September each year.

Nominations are considered by the Committee who then put the successful candidate forward for approval at the Annual General Meeting. In recommending the award of the prize the Committee will give primary consideration to the quality of the doctoral student, as judged by the External Examiner and evidenced in the other submitted materials.  The clarity of the Examiner's supporting statement is very important and any publication selected should show the student's independence and be central to the thesis.

The recipient of the Frith Prize will be awarded £500 and invited to deliver a Lecture at any of the Society’s meetings. Reasonable travelling and subsistence expenses incurred in connection with the delivery of the Lecture will be reimbursed. For further details see the Society’s rules 49-53.

The Frith Prize

1.  The effects of hearing loss and age on temporal coding in the auditory system

     Dr Kathryn Hopkins, University of Manchester

     University of Hull, 12 April 2012

2.  The episodic nature of repetition priming

     Dr Aidan Horner, University College London

     University of Lancaster, 10 April 2013

3.  Deconstructing imitation in autism: Mirror neurons, motion perception and movement        kinematics

     Dr Jennifer Cook, City University London

     Newcastle University, 16 July 2014