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Sir Frederic Bartlett Lectures: 1966-2014

This Lectureship is endowed by a trust fund in the name of Sir Frederic Bartlett and the first Lecture was delivered in 1966. The Lecturer is elected by the membership annually. Nominations are considered by the Committee who then put names forward to the Annual General Meeting. Nominations should be made on the grounds of distinction in experimental psychology or a cognate discipline, and the choice need not be restricted to EPS members or those of British nationality. Nominations should be sent to the Hon Secretary
by the closing date of 1 September each year.

The Lecture is delivered at a meeting of the Society and is open to the general public without payment. After the Lecture has been delivered, the Lecturer is asked to submit a manuscript of the Lecture to the Society, who undertake to publish it in the appropriate section of the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology (or elsewhere). For full details, see the Society's Rules 28-36.

Bartlett Lectureships

  1. Things, words and the brain.
    Professor R C. Oldfield, University of Oxford.
    Psychological Laboratory, Cambridge, 12 July 1966.
  2. The control of movement patterns in animals.
    Professor R.A. Hinde, University of Cambridge.
    Botany Theatre, University College London, 7 January 1969.
  3. Remembering revisited.
    Professor O.L. Zangwill, University of Cambridge.
    Physiology Theatre, Downing Street, Cambridge, 9 July 1971.
  4. Memory scanning: new findings and current controversies.
    Dr. Saul Sternberg, Bell Telephone Laboratories, U.S.A.
    Engineering Theatre, University College London, 5 January 1973.
  5. How people understand and recall stories.
    Professor G.H. Bower, Stanford University, U.S.A.
    Department of Psychology, University of Durham, 8 April 1976.
  6. Levels, hierarchies, and the locus of control.
    Dr. D.E. Broadbent, FRS., University of Oxford.
    School of Pharmacy, Brunswick Square, London, 7 January 1977.
  7. Orienting of attention.
    Professor M.I. Posner, University of Oregon, U.S.A.
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, 5 July 1979.
  8. Varieties of residual experience.
    Professor L. Weiskrantz, University of Oxford.
    Botany Lecture Theatre, University College London, 3 January 1980.
  9. Thinking as a skill.
    Professor P.N. Johnson Laird, University of Sussex.
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, 2 July 1981.
  10. Simulators and realism.
    Group Captain T.C.D. Whiteside, Anthromec Consultancy.
    Physiology Demonstration Theatre, University of Cambridge, 25 March 1982.
  11. Thoughts on the cerebral organization of memory.
    Professor B. Milner, FRS., University of Montreal, Canada.
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, 7 July 1983.
  12. The role of single neural units in the psychology of perception.
    Professor H.B. Barlow, FRS., University of Cambridge.
    Oudemanhuispoort Building, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, 5 July 1984.
  13. A neural hierarchy of memory: recognition, recency and recall.
    Professor M. Mishkin, National Institute of Mental Health, U.S.A.
    Engineering Lecture Theatre, University College London, 3 January 1985.
  14. Features and objects.
    Professor Anne Treisman, University of California, U.S.A.
    Darwin Lecture Theatre, University College London, 6 January 1987.
  15. Working memory: a pragmatic approach to theory.
    Dr. Alan Baddeley, MRC Applied Psychology Unit, Cambridge.
    Lady Margaret Hall, University of Oxford, 3 July 1987.
  16. Theoretical and experimental approaches to motor control.
    Professor Emilio Bizzi, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, U.S.A.
    University of Edinburgh, 8 July 1988.
  17. New models of the mind.
    Professor H. Christopher Longuet Higgins, FRS., University of Sussex.
    Physiology Demonstration Theatre, University of Cambridge, 6 July 1989.
  18. Associative structures in instrumental learning.
    Professor R. Rescorla, University of Pennsylvania, U.S.A
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, 5 July 1990.
  19. Does it all go together when it goes?
    Professor P.M.A. Rabbitt, University of Manchester.
    Chemistry Auditorium, University College London, 3 January 1991.
  20. Mental representation in unilateral neglect and related disorders.
    Professor E. Bisiach, University of Padua, Italy.
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, 2 April 1992.
  21. Memory Processes and memory systems.
    Professor E. Tulving, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Medical Science Auditorium, University of Toronto, Canada, 16 July 1993.
  22. Categorisation by people and by pigeons.
    Professor N.J. Mackintosh, University of Cambridge.
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, 24 March 1994.
  23. When parts are larger than wholes: Violation of monotonicity in judgements and decisions.
    Professor D. Kahneman, Princeton University, U.S.A.
    Department of Psychology, University of Birmingham, 13 July 1995.
  24. Perception and memory: The inferotemporal cortex revisited.
    Professor S.E. Iversen, University of
    Oxford. Physiology Demonstration Theatre, University of Cambridge, 4 July 1996.
  25. Representations for action: Neural coding and cognitive structure.
    Professor M. Jeannerod, Institut des Sciences Cognitives, Bron, France.
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, 20 March, 1997.
  26. Truths from illusons.
    Professor R. Gregory, University of Bristol.
    Tilley Lecture Theatre, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, 2 April 1998.
  27. When recollection fails: Memory dissociations.
    Professor L.L. Jacoby, McMaster University, USA.
    Department of Psychology, University of Durham, 6 July 1999.
  28. Causal learning.
    Professor Anthony Dickinson, University of Cambridge
    Department of Physiology, University of Cambridge, 21 July 2000.
  29. Semantic memory: A parallel distributed processing approach.
    Professor James L McClelland, Carnegie Mellon University and the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition.
    University of Manchester Medical School, 12 July 2001.
  30. Fact and artefact about blindsight.
    Professor Alan Cowey, University of Oxford
    Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, 11 July 2002.
  31. The hippocampal complex as a memory module: Implications for research and theory on recent and remote memory.
    Professor Morris Moscovitch, University of Toronto
    Madejski Lecture Theatre, University of Reading, 10 July 2003.
  32. Awesome allies in the study of language and its disorders.
    Dr. Karalyn Patterson, MRC-CBU, Cambridge
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, 31 March 2004.
  33. From cognitive neuropsychology to cognitive neuropsychiatry.
    Professor M Coltheart, Macquarie University, Australia.
    Main Lecture Theatre, University of Essex, 7 April 2005.
  34. Levels of processing speech.
    Professor A Cutler, Max-Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, The Netherlands
    Manor House, University of Birmingham, 11 April 2006.
  35. Attention and eye movements in reading, scene perception, and visual search.
    Professor Keith Rayner, University of Massachusetts, USA.
    McEwan Hall, University of Edinburgh, 6 July 2007.
  36. An associative analysis of spatial learning
    Professor John Pearce, Cardiff University
    Hearnshaw Lecture Theatre, Eleanor Rathbone Building, University of Liverpool, 10 July 2008.
  37. Collaboration and communication in children and chimpanzees
    Professor Michael Tomasello, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany
    Ground Floor Lecture Theatre, Department of Psychology, University College London, 5 January 2009.
  38. Why we need cognitive explanations of autism
    Professor Uta Frith, University College London
    Ground Floor Lecture Theatre, Department of Psychology, University College London, 6 January 2010.
  39. The specificity of processing in prefrontal cortex: From reaction times to problem-solving
    Professor Tim Shallice, University College London and International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA)
    Ground Floor Lecture Theatre, Department of Psychology, University College London, 6 January 2011.
  40. Challenging the use of adult neuropsychological models for explaining neurodevelopmental disorders: Developed versus developing brains
    Professor Annette Karmiloff-Smith, Birkbeck, University of London
    Lecture Theatre 2D1, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12 July 2012.
  41. The different worlds in which we live
    Professor John Mollon, University of Cambridge
    Lower Ground Floor Lecture Theatre, Department of Psychology, University College London, 3 January 2013.
  42. The point of no return 
    Professor Gordon D. Logan, Vanderbilt University
    University College London, 9 January 2014